Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Accessories for Warmth - Part 2: In Crochet

It's November with Thanksgiving  looming, so my mind turns to mushrooms.  "Why," you ask?  Why not?

Some are tasty, some are pretty, some are highly toxic.  Some, I imagine, are all three. They're not a vegetable.  They're not an animal.  They are their own little quirk of evolution.


Mushrooms are a personal temporary metaphor for the holiday season.  (Or is it a "metaspore"?)  Holidays are one of those human traditions that we wouldn't be quite human without.  We need to celebrate occasionally, we just tend to disagree on what to celebrate about.  Holidays are pretty when you look at them from the outside; or sometimes just confusing.  But don't let the pretty lights and smiling posters fool you.  It's what's on the inside that counts.  Good friends, good connections, and good times are what is important.  The rest is just condiments of varying quality.

Now one of the things that confused me as I grew up, was realizing that there were many families who demanded that everyone got together for given holidays, but didn't actually like interacting with each other.  I'm not really complaining.  It's one of those things that help keep winter shows going.  I just always wondered what they did after the show.  Did drunk uncle so-and-so sober up enough to enjoy the food?  Did great-aunt what's-her-face stop complaining long enough to realize what was going on around her?  These are question's that I'll wonder and never answer.  But they are their own little mushrooms.  Pretty families doing exactly what society dictates that they should do, but don't get too close.

This doesn't go for all families.  Not at all.  Some get together and actually enjoy talking to each other.    They watch a show and discuss it afterwards, or sing, or cook together, or even play games.  These are the good mushrooms.  They're not always pretty, but I would definitely prefer them in my kitchen.

I'll get off of my soap box now and introduce the next pattern.  In honor of the upcoming American holiday and of mushrooms in general, I present the Turkey Tail Scarf.  It's a bit of a turkey itself, but it has good intentions at heart.  I hope that you enjoy it.

If you would like a PDF of this pattern and have a Ravelry account, a copy can be found here.

If you would prefer a PDF from Etsy, it can be found here.

Feel free to change the thread, gauge, or size to fit your needs.  Add an edging, or leave it as is.  Just please do not try to sell this pattern as your own.

If you have any problems that you think that I might be able to help you with, email me at GridMammalCrafts@gmail.com .

Happy festive occasion where ever you are.


Turkey Tail Scarf

Materials:
·         2 Skeins Knit Picks, Brava Worsted, 100% Premium Acrylic; 218 yards, Color – Orange
·         Size I, 5.5 mm Crochet Hook
·         Stitch Marker
·         Darning Needle

Finished Size:
·         8” Wide x 70” Long


Gauge:

·         4 Stitches x 4 Rows = 1” x 1” in single crochet

Notes:
·         Pattern is written with American crochet terms
·         There are a suggested number of repeats to replicate the scarf shown.  The exact number of repeats is optional.


Key:

Instructions:
Starting Ring
Base: Ch12, sl st into the first ch to form a loop
Round 1: sc24 around base loop
Round 2: ch1, 2sc blo of each sc from the previous round
Round 3: (sc in the next 3 sc from the previous round, ch3) x 12

First Section
Row 1: Sl st into the next 3sc and the first 2ch, (ch 12, skip 3 ch3 spaces, sl st into the next ch3 space) x 2
Row 2: Turn work, (sc24 over ch12) x 2, sl st into the ch3 space
Row 3: Turn work, sc blo through 23 sc, skip 2sc, sc blo through 23 sc, sl st into the ch3 space
Row 4: Turn work, (sc in next4sc, ch3) x 5, sl st in next 6 sc, (ch3, sc in next 4sc) x 5, sl st into ch3 space

Second Section

Row 5: Turn work, sl st in the 4 sc and 2 ch, ch 10, skip 1 ch3 space, sl st in the next ch3 space, ch 6, sl st in next ch3 space, ch 14, skip 2 ch3 spaces, sl st in the next ch3 space, ch 6, sl st in next ch3 space, ch 10, skip 1 ch3 space, sl st in the next ch3 space
Row 6: Turn work, sc15 over ch10 space, sc10 over ch6 space, sc24 over ch12 space, sc10 over ch6 space, sc15 over ch10 space, sl st in ch3 space
Row 7: Turn work, sc blo through 14 sc, skip 2 sc, sc blo through 8 sc, skip 2 sc, sc blo through 22 sc, skip 2 sc, sc blo through 8 sc, skip 2 sc, sc blo through 14 sc, sl st in ch3 space
Row 8: Turn work, sl st in 17 sc, sc in next sc, ch 3, sc in the next 7 sc, (ch 3, sc in the next 4 sc) x 4, ch 3, sc in the next 7 sc, ch 3, sc in the next sc, sl st in the next sc

Third Section

Row 1: Sl st into the next sc and the first 2ch, (ch 12, skip 3 ch3 spaces, sl st into the next ch3 space) x 2
Row 2: Turn work, (sc24 over ch12) x 2, sl st into the ch3 space
Row 3: Turn work, sc blo through 23 sc, skip 2sc, sc blo through 23 sc, sl st into the ch3 space
Row 4: Turn work, (sc in next4sc, ch3) x 5, sl st in next 6 sc, (ch3, sc in next 4sc) x 5, sl st into ch3 space



Repeat the second and third section fifteen more times.
Break yarn and weave in ends.
Wet and block scarf.
Enjoy.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Accessories For Warmth - Part 1: In Knitting

It's cold out there.  And in this time of harried excitement, shopping, cooking, prepping, and generally trying to keep one's sanity, it is important to keep your head warm.   So take a moment, breath, and hopefully, enjoy this cap.  The tight cabling on top will help to keep out those dastardly winds and keep your ears from freezing to your head.  It is also designed to be double sided, so if you spill your drink or your mother-in-law's parrot takes exception to one side, you can turn in inside out and it will be as if never happened (from an outsider's perspective).

This cap is another one to come out of the archives.  It came about while I was experimenting with double sided cables and ribbing.  The two work together pretty well for a stocking cap.  The first example that I knitted up in malabrigo worsted merino wool.  It came out looking neat, kind of like the top of a acorn.  Hence its name.


It came out pretty big though and I felt that the pattern needed a little tweaking.  Recently I knitted this cap in Bumblebirch, Forage.  It's still a merino yarn, but this time a superwash in four-ply.  The change in yarn made the cap a bit denser, but also more fitted and wind resistant. Either way, the pattern takes an entire skein of yarn, and possibly two if you use the malabrigo.  I hope that this cap keeps you or your's warm this season, and for many more to come.

If you would like a PDF of this pattern and have a Ravelry account, a copy can be found here.

If you would like a PDF of this pattern from Etsy, it can be found here.

Feel free to change the yarn, gauge, or size to fit your needs.  Just please do not try to sell this pattern as your own.

If you have any problems that you think I might be able to help you with, email me at GridMammalCrafts@gmail.com .

Cupula Stocking Cap
Materials:
·         Size 7, 4.5mm Double Point Knitting Needles
·         Size 7, 4.5mm Circular Knitting Needles (Optional)
·         Size 6, 4.0 mm Double Point or Circular Knitting Needles (For hat brim)
·         1 skein Bumblebirch, Forage, 100% superwash merino,Colorway: Eggplant
·         Stitch Marker
·         Darning Needle
Gauge:
·          20 Stitches x 24 Rows = 4” x 4” in Stockinette on size 7 needles
Finished Size:
·          Adult: to fit a 22” diameter head snuggly
Notes:
·         Stitch counts are written at the end of the round in (Blue Italics)
·         Knit each chart row six times in the round.
·         Complete the Repeat Section three times.
·         The Ribbing Section can be made as long as desired, but I suggest making it at least three inches long.  (18 repeats of round 52)
·         Bind off loosely in the knit one purl one pattern
In repeat section row 35, save the first cable cross in the start of the round until the end of the row. Be sure to take out the place marker, knit the first two crossed stitches, and replace the marker, then knit the second two stitches. Continue with pattern as if the row started normally.



Crown Chart:
Crown Written Instructions:
Cast on 6 stitches.
Round 1: (kfb) x 6 – (12 sts)
Round 2: (k2) x 6
Round 3: (kfb2) x 6 – (24 sts)
Round 4: (k1, p1, k1, p1) x 6
Round 5: (k1, lli, p1, k1, lli, p1) x 6 – (36 sts)
Round 6: (k2, p1, k2, p1) x 6
Round 7: (kfb, k1, p1, kfb, k1, p1) x 6 – (48 sts)
Round 8: (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1) x 6
Round 9: (k1, lli, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, lli, p1) x 6 – (60 sts)
Round 10: (k2, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k2, p1) x 6
Round 11: (kfb, k1, p1, kp/kp rc, kfb, k1, p1) x 6 – (72 sts)
Round 12: [(k1, p1) x 6] x 6
Round 13: (k1, lli, (p1, k1) x 5, lli, p1) x 6 – (84 sts)
Round 14: (k2, (p1, k1) x 4, p1, k2, p1) x 6
Round 15: (kfb, k1, p1, (kp/kp lc) x 2, kfb, k1, p1) x 6 – (96 sts)
Round 16: [(k1, p1) x 8] x 6
Round 17: (k1, lli, (p1, k1) x 7, lli, p1) x 6 – (108 sts)
Round 18: (k2, (p1, k1) x 6, p1, k2, p1) x 6
Round 19: (kfb, k1, p1, (kp/kp rc) x 3, kfb, k1, p1) x 6 – (120 sts)
Round 20: [(k1, p1) x 10] x 6
Round 21: (k1, lli, (p1, k1) x 9, lli, p1) x 6 – (132 sts)
Round 22: (k2, (p1, k1) x 8, p1, k2, p1) x 6
Round 23: (kfb, k1, p1, (kp/kp lc) x 4, kfb, k1, p1) x 6 – (144 sts)
Round 24: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 25: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 26: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 27: (k1, p1, (kp/kp rc) x 5, k1, p1) x 6
Round 28: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 29: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6

Round 30: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6


Repeat Section Chart:
Repeat Section Written Instructions:
Round 31: [(kp/kp lc) x 6] x 6
Round 32: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 33: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 34: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 35: k1, p1, (kp/kp rc) x 5, [(kp/kp lc) x 6] x 5,  kp/kp rc (This final kp/kp rc will happen over the stitch marker. Be sure that the stitch marker returns to the middle of the cable cross.)
Round 36: (k 1, p1,) x 11, (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1) x 5
Round 37: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 38: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6
Round 39: [(k1, p1) x 12] x 6

(Repeat rows 31 through39 twice more)

Ribbing Chart:
Ribbing Section Written Instructions:
Switch to size 6 needles.
Round 51: (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, cdd, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1) x 6 – (132 sts)
Round 52: [(k1, p1) x 11] x 6
(Repeat round 52 eighteen more times minimum.)
(As shown, round 52 is repeated twenty-four more times.)

Cast off loosely in pattern.

Break yarn and weave in ends.

                                                     


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Halloween - Part 2: In Crochet

Nearly every night Bug-A-Boo asks to sing "The Itsy Bitsy Spider".  This, of course, includes all of the hand motions.  It's one of her favorite songs, mostly because of the had movements I think.  When we sing it in the car, she even runs through her version of the motions from her car seat.


It's a cute song.  It's nice and short, which unfortunately lends itself to repetition.  And at this point I'm pretty positive I could go through the whole thing, hands and all, in my sleep.

After the umpteenth time my mind has started to wonder while singing this song.  Sometimes it's different lyrics, which I am told are not OK to sing out loud.  Sometimes I just wonder if that itsy bitsy spider ever gets to be a big fat spider.

Out of this wondering came a Halloween doily and a short poem to go along with it.

If you would like a PDF of this pattern and have a Ravelry account, a copy can be found here.

If you would prefer a PDF from Etsy, it can be found here.

Feel free to change the thread, gauge, or size to fit your needs.  Add an edging, or leave it as is.  Just please do not try to sell this pattern as your own.

If you have any problems that you think that I might be able to help you with, email me at GridMammalCrafts@gmail.com .

Happy Halloween.

The Busy Spider

At once the little spider jumped out into the breeze, 
And landed on a fence post with the gentlest of ease.
She quickly got herself to work at spinning up her web,
And when her work all was done, she scampered off to bed.
Now I did not see her home as I climbed into the yard, 
But I certainly took notice when I found my way was barred.
I struggled and I swore, but it was all for naught.
For when it came down to it, I was absolutely caught.
Che came down to greet me and I plainly heard her say,
"Oh lucky me, I get to eat what cannot get away."

The Busy Spider Doily

Materials:
·         2 Spools Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Thread, Classic 10, %100 Mercerized Cotton, Color: Black, 350 yds
·         Size 8, 1.5 mm Crochet Hook
·         Small Darning Needle
Gauge:
·         46.2 stitches x 23.4 rows = 4” x  4”
·         15.4 squares x 23.4 rows = 4” x 4”
Finished Size:
·         20.5” Wide x 13.5” Tall
Notes:
·         Chart rows that are highlighted yellow are duplicate rows from a previous chart.
·         Remember, the last double crochet stitch in a block is the first double crochet stitch of the next block
·         All instructions are written in American crochet terminology.



Key:
            Filet Crochet
·         Filled Square = 1 Double Crochet Stitch through the top of the next 4 stitches from the previous row
-          First Filled Square in Row
-          Filled Square
·         Open Square = 1 Double Crochet Stitch, Chain 2, skip 2 stitches of the previous row, 1 Double Crochet Stitch in the next stitch of the previous row
-          Open Square
Chart Layout:
·         Unfortunately, for ease of reading, the pattern had to be broken up over several pages.  The edges of each row and column are numbered and the section of the pattern is labelled with a header.  The sections are oriented as shown in the following table.  I would suggest, depending on your tastes, working along an entire row as you go along.  This will take you across a couple pattern pieces as you finish each line.  On the final page you will find the pattern in its entirety, but very small to fit on a single page.
A
B
C
D

Just the Beginning:
Base: Chain 238 (loosely) + chain 3     
                        (This the will create a base chain of 238 and the chain 3 will be the first double stitch of the wall of the first square)
            Row 1: Turn work, double crochet into the fifth chain from the hook, double crochet into the next 236 ch
            Row 2: Chain 3, turn work, dc into the second dc from the hook, dc into the next 235 dc, dc in the end ch 3
            Rows 3, 4,  & 5: Chain 3, turn work, dc into the second dc from the hook, dc into the next 5dc, (ch 2, skip 2 dc, dc in the next dc) x 3, dc in the next 6 dc, (ch 2, skip 2 dc, dc in the next dc) x 65, dc in the next 6 dc, (ch 2, skip 2 dc, dc in the next dc) x 3, dc in the next 5 dc,  dc in the end ch 3



Charts:
A

B

C

D

Whole Chart